"The trumpet of prophecy" in the second to last line of "Ode to the West Wind" refers to Shelley's own writing. Explain the line "The trumpet of prophecy" from "Ode to the West Wind." The rhyme scheme in each part follows a pattern known as terza rima, the three-line rhyme scheme employed by Dante in his Divine Comedy. Though describing leaves, this line contains a poetic device called a metaphor to compare dying autumn leaves with people stricken by pestilence. In the summary of Ode to the West Wind’s second stanza we will get a picture of the fierce storm which the West Wind brings along with it.The poet describes the West Wind as a stream on which the clouds are strewn across like dead leaves of the imaginary tree which has its roots and boughs in the oceans of Earth and heaven respectively. When Shelley penned “Ode to the West Wind” in 1819, many people in England were actually starving and sickening. A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics. Ode to the West Wind Summary. Each of the seven parts of “Ode to the West Wind” contains five stanzas—four three-line stanzas and a two-line couplet, all metered in iambic pentameter. As if using terza rima weren’t enough to make "Ode to the West Wind" remind us of Dante, Shelley also divides the poem into cantos, the Italian poetry equivalent of chapters. Thanks for exploring this SuperSummary Plot Summary of “Ode to the West Wind” by Percy Bysshe Shelley. In … Shelley fixes this problem by following each set of four three-line stanzas with a couplet. ODE TO THE WEST WIND Shelley's ode to the West Wind v. 05.19, www.philaletheians.co.uk, 19 August 2018 Page 3 of 13 Ode to the West Wind 1 O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being, 2 Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead 3 Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing, 4 Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red, Though describing leaves, this line contains a poetic device called a metaphor to compare dying autumn leaves with people stricken by pestilence. Analysis of Ode to The West Wind – Stanza Two. When Shelley penned “Ode to the West Wind” in 1819, many people in England were actually starving and sickening. Introduction “Ode to the West Wind” is an ode, written by Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1819 near Florescent, Italy.It was originally published in 1820 by Edmund Ollier and Charles in London.